Intensive simulation training on urological mini-invasive procedures using Thiel-embalmed cadavers: The IAMSurgery experience

  • Guglielmo Mantica | guglielmo.mantica@gmail.com IAMSurgery, International Accademy of Miniinvasive Surgery; Department of Urology, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, University of Genova, Italy.
  • Giovannalberto Pini IAMSurgery, International Accademy of Miniinvasive Surgery; Department of Urology, San Raffaele Turro Hospital, Milan, Italy.
  • Davide De Marchi IAMSurgery, International Accademy of Miniinvasive Surgery; Department of Urology, San Raffaele Turro Hospital, Milan, Italy.
  • Irene Paraboschi Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), University of Genova, Italy.
  • Francesco Esperto Department of Urology, Campus Bio-medico University of Rome, Italy.
  • André Van der Merwe Department of Urology, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Heidi Van Deventer Department of Urology, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Massimo Garriboli Department of Pediatric Urology, Evelina Children Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
  • Nazareno Suardi Department of Urology, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, University of Genova, Italy.
  • Carlo Terrone Department of Urology, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, University of Genova, Italy.
  • Rosario Leonardi IAMSurgery, International Accademy of Miniinvasive Surgery; Department of Urology, San Raffaele Turro Hospital, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Introduction: The objective of the study was to evaluate the benefits perceived by the use of cadaver models by IAMSurgery attendees and to define indications to standardize future similar training camps.
Materials and methods: A 25-item survey was distributed via e-mail to all the participants of previous training courses named as “Urological Advanced Course on Laparoscopic Cadaver Lab" held at the anatomy department of the University of Malta, for anonymous reply. Participants were asked to rate the training course, the Thiel’s cadaveric model, and make comparison with other previously experienced simulation tools.
Results: The survey link was sent to 84 attendees, with a response rate of 47.6% (40 replies). There was improvement in the median self-rating of the laparoscopic skills before and after the training camp with a mean difference of 0.55/5 points in the post-training skills compared to the basal (p < 0.0001). The 72.2% of the urologists interviewed considered Thiel's HCM better than other training methods previously tried, while five urologists (27.8%) considered it equal (p = 0.00077). Globally, 77.5% (31) of attendees found the training course useful, and 82.5% (33) would advise it to colleagues.
Conclusions: Thiel’s fixed human cadaveric models seem to be ideal for training purposes, and their use within properly structured training camps could significantly improve the surgical skills of the trainees. An important future step could be standardization of the training courses using cadavers, and their introduction into the standardized European curriculum.

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Published
2020-06-23
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Section
Original Papers - Andrology
Keywords:
Training, cadaver model, urology, Thiel fixation, simulation
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How to Cite
Mantica, G., Pini, G., De Marchi, D., Paraboschi, I., Esperto, F., Van der Merwe, A., Van Deventer, H., Garriboli, M., Suardi, N., Terrone, C., & Leonardi, R. (2020). Intensive simulation training on urological mini-invasive procedures using Thiel-embalmed cadavers: The IAMSurgery experience. Archivio Italiano Di Urologia E Andrologia, 92(2). https://doi.org/10.4081/aiua.2020.2.93

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